Something Old, Something New

I’m one of those quilters who loves books about quilting, though not necessarily books of quilting patterns.  While I love learning about new books on C&T Publishing’s blog, I also like to turn up books at remainder and used book sales.

A routine scouting expedition through a library used book shop unearthed Kaffe Fassett’s “Passionate Patchwork” from 2001.  I’ve read lots of his books, and even his autobiography, but for some reason I had never come across this one.  I read Kaffe’s books for the sumptuous photographs and descriptions of the design process.  Though I like many of his quilt patterns, I’ve made up only one of them.

Passionate Patchwork

In this book the first five chapters talk about the quilts in general – their inspirational starting point, how the colors were chosen, and further ideas for different ways to make them up. Kaffe’s enthusiasm and passion for color just bubbles throughout these chapters.  If his words don’t spark some creative ideas then I pity you.  Twenty-four patchwork patterns follow, as do general quilting instructions.  My advice is to skip the last and just use your preferred construction methods.

Patterns that particularly appeal to me include Shirt-stripe Boxes shown below (which is very modern quilting in sensibility), Nona (modernish again,) Baby’s Corrugated Quilt (a precursor to “Quilting Modern”?) and African Weave Throw. Yes, all these patterns use stripes.

shirt-stripe-boxes

As for the something new, I discovered Sherrill Kahn‘s “Mixed-Media Master Class” on C&T’s blog and tracked it down in an odd area of my local library. I think the cataloguers threw up their hands about how to classify it and stuck it under Arts – Miscellany.

Mixed-media-master-class

Kahn is a former school art teacher, so she knows lots of inexpensive ways to make patterns on paper and fabric – masking tape, rubber bands, Styrofoam meat trays, old white candles, and colored tissue paper are a few of the materials she uses.  Probably the most expensive materials she uses are Derwent Inktense pencils.  After I marked 10 techniques I wanted to photocopy, I decided I’d better buy this book.  I think they’ll be great to try with my Different Drummer group.

Sherrill-KahnAbove is one of Kahn’s paper creations.  She often uses the pointy end of a paintbrush to score the surface.

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