My Entry To This Year’s Blogger’s Quilt Festival

Amy Ellis of Amy’s Creative Side is returning to basics this year with her Blogger’s Quilt Festival – no voting, with prizes awarded by random number. I love the idea of sharing quilts that might not otherwise be seen, and the excitement of seeing quilts that are new to me.

I decided to enter “A Grand Day Out,” which features my girls. I know they’re eager to explore the world, so I’ll help them begin online.

I drew the girls from a photo of a crowd of young women, and decided to have them enjoy the waves, even though they’re not dressed for swimming. Of course the flotilla of hot air balloons capped their wonderful day out.

Technical details:

-the girls were constructed like paper dolls using fusible interfacing

-the waves are hand dyed and painted cheesecloth

-the balloons are made of fused cotton and silk fabric

-the background was constructed and quilted before I added the applique

-details were highlighted with Fabrico markers

-size is 24 by 36 inches.

My favorite part: the girls’ hats.

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Filed under Art quilts, Completed Projects

Around Here Week 37

We’re into September now and leaves will be dropping from trees soon. Here’s one that got a head start, though it looks like the bugs played a role in its demise. Possibly good for a stencil or some big stitch embroidery.

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This Year’s SAQA Auction

Recently I’ve received many emails and Instagram posts about the upcoming SAQA small quilts auction, scheduled for September 15 through October 8. Messages remind me of the number of lovely quilts and how helpful the funds raised are to SAQA. A fun aspect is the themed groups of quilts selected by SAQA members.

Benefit Auction starts Sept 15th!

The 2017 SAQA Benefit Auction will take place from September 15 through October 8. This is your chance to own beautiful and unique art quilts made by SAQA members around the world – 368 pieces are available for bidding! For details, visit saqa.com/auction.

Once again I didn’t make a quilt to contribute. As I’ve said before, I have a hard time producing anything meaningful at 12 by 12 inches. Some contributors manage to pack a lot into that space.

As I did last year, I categorized the themes used. This year landscapes were most common theme by a long shot, being featured in 37 quilts, followed by botanicals in 27 quilts. The ever popular birds came in with 20 (not so many crows this year,) followed closely by people in 18 quilts. Animals were featured in 14 quilts, and bugs were the main attraction in 5. The themes used in the rest of this year’s crop were either abstract or one-offs. Of course, others will most likely come up with different ways to sort the quilts.

You can peruse all this year’s entries here. My favorites based on one review of the contributions are:

I realize each of my choices tell a story in 12 by 12 inches, even the one by Linda Colsh. If you look closely at “Crossing Paths” you’ll see a figure laden with packages. If I figure out a way to pack a story into 144 square inches I’ll make an entry for a future auction.

 

 

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Around Here Week 36

Sometimes simple is the best. Morning shadows on my deck wowed me. I did use color filters on two of my photos, just for variety.

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Tracing Cloth Play

A chance discovery of Pellon 830, called Easy Pattern, led me to experiment with ways to use it. Pellon calls it an interfacing-tracing cloth. I bought a bolt of it to make a sample pattern for my silk vest (Why a bolt? It was a 60% off sale and the usual price was $2.48/yard. You do the math.) That went well as 830 sews nicely, but then I began to wonder about other uses.

Out came the paints, the watercolor pencils, the crayons, the stamps, and the brushes. First, I soaked pieces of 830 in containers filled with diluted fabric paint, which resulted in soft pastels. Then I began to stencil and stamp it.

I fused some of the colored 830 to Wonder Under, cut it up and ironed it to fabric. Then I quilted it. I found that it doesn’t fray and even three layers are quite thin.

On other experimental fronts, I traced stencils with markers and found the result to be crisper than on fabric.

Then, I traced a flower from a quilt photo (the 830 is translucent), colored it with watercolor pencils, and outlined it with a fine tip black marker. I think traced designs could be cut out and fused to fabric.

About the time I began my tracing cloth play, I found out that Betty Busby uses this stuff in her quilts. A friend took a class with her where students used this and Evolon. Busby has her students use a Silhouette Cameo machine to cut out original designs from these materials. Here are pieces Busby made that incorporate nonwovens.

“Buffalo Gourd’s” leaves are made of nonwoven material, and sewn onto hand painted silk.

Busby developed “Toupee The Turtle” to teach students how to use nonwoven material. It looks like the background is hand painted fabric.

There are numerous advantages of this material. It cuts easily, is washable, doesn’t fray, is fusible, can be sewn on, takes paint and marking tools well, and is translucent enough to trace designs onto it. You don’t get the drag of fabric when you use pencils or markers on it. Oh, did I mention it’s cheap?

I encountered a few disadvantages. The fabric paints I used didn’t dry to exceptionally intense colors but were more pastel. However, I diluted my paint, so full strength paint may give more color. I haven’t tried acrylic paint or dyes so I can’t speak to how well they do. Also, unless you can get opaque coverage from paint, any fabric used underneath 830 will show through a bit.

Busby’s work shows me I have lots more experimenting to do with this material. Lucky for me I have most of a bolt left.

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Filed under Project Ideas, Techniques

Around Here Week 35

This bold spiky beauty is an ornamental onion, called Globemaster. The blue color is startling, not usual in flowers. It’s a blue that makes my retinas tingle, in a good way.

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Just Under The Wire

I managed to squeeze in one more finish in August – “Transgendered.”

Because the quilt is about 54 by 61 inches, I had it quilted by a local longarm quilter who did ruler work on it.

It’s based on a quilt called “Fire and Ice” by Fun Easy Designed. I saw the picture and thought it would be a great way to use a bag of scraps I had purchased from Sew Batik. It seems I purchase only scraps rather than yardage from that vendor, but my rationale is I’m sure to find fabrics I would never buy otherwise.The pink fabrics came from stash and include batiks, and hand dyed and painted fabrics.

You can see I kept the two color concept and the corner wonky triangles but changed the line of demarcation to a diagonal. I also changed the size of the rectangles.

The title came about as I considered the tyranny of making blue quilts for baby boys and pink ones for baby girls. See this post from the Textile Ranger about how that wasn’t always the case. My personal feeling is that gender is fluid along a continuum. We all have bits of male and female in us. Just the proportions differ. The recent skirmishes about transgendered people led me to the title.

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Filed under Completed Projects